July 30, 2017

NAVAJO NATION : Artists Point Overlook - Oljato・Monument Valley


Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park



Artist's Point at Sunset, Oljato-Monument Valley, Navajo Nation, Utah/Arizona


Oljato-Monument Valley

Monument Valley is perhaps the most famous example of the classic American West landscape, located within the Navajo Nation on the border of Arizona and Utah. The valley has been the backdrop for numerous western movies, ranging from the films of John Wayne to Back to the Future 3 and Forrest Gump.

Note that the entire Navajo Nation observes Mountain Daylight Savings Time from April through October, putting it one hour ahead of the time in other Arizona locations, or the same time as Utah.

History
Archaeological evidence indicates that the ancient Anasazi people inhabited the valley until AD 1300. Today over 100 sites and ruins have been found dating from these ancient people, including rock art. The Anasazi abandoned the area in the 1300's, leaving it empty of humans until the arrival of the Navajo.

Flora and fauna
The valley has wide a assortment of vegetation including, Juniper trees, yucca, Russian thistle (Tumbleweed) and Navajo Tea to name just a few. Much of the vegetation is still used by the Navajos for medicinal purposes, and as dyes for their world famous hand-woven rugs.

Climate
Temperatures range from the upper 80's to low 90's in the summer. The winters are mild ranging from the upper 40's to mid 50's. Summer nights are cool and comfortable. Winter lows are generally in the mid to upper 20's. The summers are dry except during the monsoon season — beware of flash flooding during this time. Winters see some snow, which brings out the spectacular colors of the valley.

Eat
Goulding's Lodge has a restaurant, the park's visitor center sells snacks, and there may be stands around the park offering Navajo fry-bread and other items. The View Restaurant is located at the visitor center, and is open for 3 meals, serving American and traditional Navajo cuisine.

Drink
Drinking water and other beverages are available at the visitor center and at the campground store. There are no other water supplies in the valley, so be sure to carry enough with you.

Note that alcoholic beverages are prohibited on Navajo lands.



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Dave Liebman - Marc Copland
Dave Liebman Marc Copland - In Your Own Sweet Way
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July 28, 2017

NAVAJO NATION : West Mitten Butte - Oljato・Monument Valley

West Mitten Butte


Silhouette of West Mitten Butte at sunrise, Oljato-Monument Valley
Navajo Nation, Utah/Arizona


West and East Mitten Buttes

West and East Mitten Buttes (also known collectively as The Mittens) are two distinctive geological features found within the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park in northeast Navajo County, Arizona. When viewed from the south, the buttes appear to be two gigantic mittens with their thumbs facing inwards.

The two buttes are about 0.6 miles (0.97 km) from the Arizona–Utah state line and West Mitten Butte is 1.1 miles (1.8 km) northeast of the park headquarters. The summit of West Mitten Butte is 6,176 feet (1,882 m) and East Mitten Butte is 6,226 feet (1,898 m) in elevation.

The Mittens form a triangle with Merrick Butte about 2/3 of a mile to the south and, with Sentinel Mesa.

The buttes are made of three principal rock layers. The lowest layer is Organ Rock Shale, the middle is de Chelly Sandstone, and the top layer is the Moenkopi Formation capped by Shinarump Conglomerate.


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Celso Fonseca
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July 23, 2017

ARIZONA : South Rim - Grand Canyon National Park


The Beautiful Landscape of 
Grand Canyon National Park



Grand Canyon at Sunset, Grand Canyon National Park, ARIZONA  🎷 🎶 🎸


Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon (Hopi: Ongtupqa; Yavapai: Wi:kaʼi:la, Navajo: Tsékooh Hatsoh, Spanish: Gran Cañón) is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in the U.S. state of Arizona in North America. The canyon and adjacent rim are contained within Grand Canyon National Park, the Kaibab National Forest, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, the Hualapai Indian Reservation, the Havasupai Indian Reservation and the Navajo Nation. President Theodore Roosevelt was a major proponent of preservation of the Grand Canyon area, and visited it on numerous occasions to hunt and enjoy the scenery.

The Grand Canyon is 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide and attains a depth of over a mile (6,093 feet or 1,857 meters). Nearly two billion years of Earth's geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. While some aspects about the history of incision of the canyon are debated by geologists, several recent studies support the hypothesis that the Colorado River established its course through the area about 5 to 6 million years ago. Since that time, the Colorado River has driven the down-cutting of the tributaries and retreat of the cliffs, simultaneously deepening and widening the canyon.

For thousands of years, the area has been continuously inhabited by Native Americans, who built settlements within the canyon and its many caves. The Pueblo people considered the Grand Canyon a holy site, and made pilgrimages to it. The first European known to have viewed the Grand Canyon was García López de Cárdenas from Spain, who arrived in 1540.


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Joe Henderson
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July 19, 2017

NAVAJO NATION : East Mitten Butte and Merrick Butte - Oljato・Monument Valley


Arizona Utah Oljato-Monument Valley
East Mitten Butte and Merrick Butte📌



East Mitten Butte and Merrick Butte at Sunrise, Oljato-Monument Valley, Navajo Nation, Utah/Arizona


Merrick Butte

Merrick Butte is a butte located in Monument Valley in extreme northeast Navajo County, Arizona. It is located 1.4 miles (2.3 km) east of the monument headquarters and 1.25 miles (2.01 km) south of the Arizona–Utah state line. It is part of the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park and is similar to its neighbors West and East Mitten Buttes just to the north.

West and East Mitten Buttes

West and East Mitten Buttes (also known collectively as The Mittens) are two distinctive geological features found within the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park in northeast Navajo County, Arizona. When viewed from the south, the buttes appear to be two gigantic mittens with their thumbs facing inwards.

The two buttes are about 0.6 miles (0.97 km) from the Arizona–Utah state line and West Mitten Butte is 1.1 miles (1.8 km) northeast of the park headquarters. The summit of West Mitten Butte is 6,176 feet (1,882 m)[1] and East Mitten Butte is 6,226 feet (1,898 m) in elevation.

The Mittens form a triangle with Merrick Butte about 2/3 of a mile to the south and, with Sentinel Mesa.

The buttes are made of three principal rock layers. The lowest layer is Organ Rock Shale, the middle is de Chelly Sandstone, and the top layer is the Moenkopi Formation capped by Shinarump Conglomerate.


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Marc Copland Trio
Marc Copland Trio - Soul Eyes
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July 16, 2017

NAVAJO NATION : Merrick Butte - Oljato・Monument Valley

Merrick Butte 
in Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park


Merrick Butte at dusk, Oljato-Monument Valley, Navajo Nation, Utah/Arizona


Merrick Butte

Merrick Butte is a butte located in Monument Valley in extreme northeast Navajo County, Arizona. It is located 1.4 miles (2.3 km) east of the monument headquarters and 1.25 miles (2.01 km) south of the Arizona–Utah state line. It is part of the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park and is similar to its neighbors West and East Mitten Buttes just to the north.


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Paolo Rustichelli with Miles Davis
Paolo Rustichelli with Miles Davis 
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July 12, 2017

MONTANA : Glacier Wildflowers - Wild Bergamot

Monarda fistulosa

Wild bergamot
Family : Lamiaceae
Genus  : Monarda

Types of pink flowers, Monarda fistulosa (Wild bergamot), Glacier National Park, Montana


Monarda fistulosa

Monarda fistulosa, the wild bergamot or bee balm, is a wildflower in the mint family (Lamiaceae) widespread and abundant as a native plant in much of North America. This plant, with showy summer-blooming pink to lavender flowers, is often used as a honey plant, medicinal plant, and garden ornamental. The species is quite variable, and several subspecies or varieties have been recognized within it.

Monarda fistulosa is an herbaceous perennial that grows from slender creeping rhizomes, thus commonly occurring in large clumps. The plants are typically up to 3 ft (0.9 m) tall, with a few erect branches. Its leaves are about 2-3 in (5–8 cm) long, lance-shaped, and toothed. Its compact flower clusters are solitary at the ends of branches. Each cluster is about 1.5 in (4 cm) long, containing about 20–50 flowers. Wild bergamot often grows in rich soils in dry fields, thickets, and clearings, usually on limy soil. The plants generally flower from June to September.

Monarda fistulosa ranges from Quebec to the Northwest Territories and British Columbia, south to Georgia, Texas, Arizona, Idaho, and northeastern Washington.

The plant is noted for its fragrance, and is a source of oil of thyme.



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Robert Lakatos Trio
Robert Lakatos Trio - Never Let Me Go 
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July 9, 2017

MONTANA : Glacier Wildflowers - Bee Balm

Monarda fistulosa

Bee Balm
Family : Lamiaceae
Genus  : Monarda

Newly opened Wild Bergamot flower - Bee Balm, Glacier National Park, Montana

Monarda fistulosa

Monarda fistulosa, the wild bergamot or bee balm, is a wildflower in the mint family (Lamiaceae) widespread and abundant as a native plant in much of North America. This plant, with showy summer-blooming pink to lavender flowers, is often used as a honey plant, medicinal plant, and garden ornamental. The species is quite variable, and several subspecies or varieties have been recognized within it.

Monarda fistulosa is an herbaceous perennial that grows from slender creeping rhizomes, thus commonly occurring in large clumps. The plants are typically up to 3 ft (0.9 m) tall, with a few erect branches. Its leaves are about 2-3 in (5–8 cm) long, lance-shaped, and toothed. Its compact flower clusters are solitary at the ends of branches. Each cluster is about 1.5 in (4 cm) long, containing about 20–50 flowers. Wild bergamot often grows in rich soils in dry fields, thickets, and clearings, usually on limy soil. The plants generally flower from June to September.

Monarda fistulosa ranges from Quebec to the Northwest Territories and British Columbia, south to Georgia, Texas, Arizona, Idaho, and northeastern Washington.

The plant is noted for its fragrance, and is a source of oil of thyme.


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René Thomas
René Thomas - Ruby, my dear 
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July 4, 2017

MONTANA : Glacier Wildflowers - yellow sweet clover

Yellow Sweet Clover
Family : Fabaceae
Genus  : Melilotus

yellow sweet clover, composition in black and white photography


Melilotus officinalis - Yellow Sweet Clover, Glacier National park, Montana   FUJICHROME Velvia 50

Melilotus officinalis

Melilotus officinalis, known as yellow sweet clover, yellow melilot, ribbed melilot and common melilot is a species of legume native to Eurasia and introduced in North America, Africa and Australia.

Melilotus officinalis can be an annual or biennial plant, and is 4–6 feet (1.2–1.8 m) high at maturity. Leaves alternate on the stem and possess three leaflets. Yellow flowers bloom in spring and summer and produce fruit in pods typically containing one seed. Seeds can be viable for up to 30 years. Plants have large taproots and tend to grow in groups. Plants have a characteristic sweet odor.

Habitat
M. officinalis is native to Europe and Asia and has been introduced to North America as a forage crop. It commonly grows in calcareous loamy and clay soils with a pH above 6.5 and can tolerate cold temperatures and drought; it does not tolerate standing water. Common places where it can be found include open disturbed land, prairies, and savannahs, and it grows in full or partial sunlight. It is an invasive species in areas where it has been introduced, especially in open grasslands and woodlands where it shades and outcompetes native plant species.


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Joe Lovano
Joe Lovano - Portrait Of Jenny (Robinson-Budge) 
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